Search
Generic filters

Words, Words, Words: How to help your child with vocabulary

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on email
Email
NAP

Learning new words is an everyday aspect of the school journey, but some parents may be unsure of how to support their child when expanding their vocabularies, particularly when they seem a little lost and overwhelmed by certain new words. This week, Lauren from North Shore Speech Therapy shows how a simple activity using new vocabulary words can begin to foster a deeper knowledge of word meaning.


Research shows that children with more robust vocabularies perform better academically. When learning new words, it’s important to be confident that your child really understands the word, not just how to say it. In depth word learning involves a number of aspects:

* Knowing how to say the word

* Knowing the word’s meaning

* How the word can be changed to make other words (e.g. “break” can become “unbreakable”)

* Understanding synonyms (words that mean the same thing) and antonyms (words that mean the opposite) for the word

* How to apply that word to different things in their environment (e.g. a “break” can mean relaxation from work, a broken bone, a smashed plate)

* At a higher level, how to read and write the word

Using synonyms (words that have the same meaning) and antonyms (words that have the opposite meaning) is one simple and fabulous way to encourage word learning. The words can be as simple or as complex as they need to be depending on your child’s age, language skills and the subject matter you might be targeting!

 


For more useful tips and tricks like this, follow North Shore Speech Therapy’s Facebook page or visit their website.

 

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on email
Email

You may also like ...

Leave a Reply

 

Search
What are you searching for?
Businesses
Events
Jobs
Articles
Information
Generic filters

SUPPORTER BOARD