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Approval for St Ives eruv and what it means for you

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Recently, the erection of an eruv in St Ives became a divisive issue in the community. With news it has been approved, we update NSMs with the details and revisit words from resident Megan Rosettenstein, explaining the significance for the community.


Ku-ring-gai Council has approved the St Ives eruv after the local council voted, 8-2, in favour of the structure.

eruv

How the eruv appears

Supported by Orthodox Jewish and non-Jewish locals, the approval means the eruv (a set of small plastic pipes attached to power poles) will stay erected in the area. According to Jewish Law, this eruv turns public space into private space and allows Jewish mums to push prams on the Sabbath, to attend synagogue with young children and to socialise with friends. If it had not been approved, those who obey the religious laws would not have ben able to leave their houses on weekends.

In the wake of the landmark decision, we revisit the piece by Megan Rosettenstein (pictured above with residents of her street), who supports the eruv.

“I have lived in St Ives for 22 years and I am a very proud Australian. I have always loved St Ives and the wonderful array of people who live in the area. I live on a wonderful street – I am friendly with all of my neighbours, and our children play together. My children garden with the wonderful lady who lives across the road from me and they love to visit the big dog a few houses down.

In our street it does not matter if you are Indian, Asian, White, Jewish, Christian, or atheist…the list goes on – we truly exemplify what St Ives and Australia is: a multi-cultural society.

Eighteen months ago, with the approval of Ausgrid, an Eruv (a set of small plastic pipes attached to power poles) was erected in the area. According to Jewish Law this Eruv turns public space into private space and allows Jewish mums to push prams on the Sabbath, to attend synagogue with young children and to socialise with friends. Eruvs have been in use since biblical times and today are in place in many major cities – New York, London, Johannesburg , Melbourne and there is one in the eastern suburbs of Sydney in Bondi. The only notable impact of the Eruv in the past eighteen months has been the sight of happy families walking to and from synagogue and friends on Saturdays. 

I believe in my heart that the greater proportion of St Ives and Australian residents support religious and cultural freedom. “

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